Vocal Habilitation Professional

Course Documents

Learning Outcomes  

The rationale  

All professional voice users are vulnerable to voice disorders, injuries, strain and maladaptions. This qualification will enable the Vocal Habilitation Professional be able to work with singers and other voice users who have been experiencing problems relating to their vocal health. The Vocal Habilitation Professional will recognise that there may be a wider issue to address and will be able to guide the client in the appropriate next steps.  

The aims and objectives  

The Vocal Habilitation Professional will have: 

  • A knowledge of the biopsychosocial causes of voice problems, including: the implications of a range of working environments, the impact of psychological stressors on voice function, evaluating vocal loading, awareness of overall mental and physical wellbeing and lifestyle factors
  • Understand the demands of a range musical genres, and the potential impact of these on vocal health
  • Understand the changes to the voice over a lifetime and the effect on vocal performance
  • Know and understand the role/s of the other professionals who are part of the rehabilitative team
  • Be able to follow on from work undertaken by a Vocal Rehabilitation Specialist with longer-term habilitative singing voice work, re-building healthy vocal function after injury or dysphonia
  • Be able to support and guide a singer with muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology
  • Know when to refer a singer for clinical assessment or help from a professional in another field 

The delivery methods

  • Online course: filmed presentations and a multiple-choice style questionnaire with 100 questions to complete at the end of the online course.
  • Online group classes 
  • Individual mentoring 
  • 1:1 assessment of the learner working with clients 
  • Access to online content
Qualification Units

 

 

Learning outcomes 
The learner will:

Assessment criteria 
The learner can:

Evidence record 
eg. method

1.Understand the biopsychosocial causes of voice problems.

 

 

1.1 Confirm the purpose of the biopsychosocial framework

 

1:2 Explain the biopsychosocial causes of voice problems.
Include: 

 

  • a range of working environments 
  • the impact of psychological stressors on voice function
  • evaluating vocal loading
  • awareness of overall wellbeing 
  • other lifestyle factors

 

1:3 Analyse the biopsychosocial causes of voice problems.

 

1:4 Evaluate external factors which may affect voice function

 

2. Understand the demands of a range musical genres, and the potential impact of these on vocal health.

 

 

2:1 Demonstrate understanding of the use of different types of microphones and IEM’s and their wider implications for voice production.  

 

2:2 Understand the demands of different genres and their impact on vocal health.

 

 

 

3. Understand the changes to the voice over a lifetime and the effect on vocal performance.

3:1 Determine the changes in the voice over a lifetime.

 

3:2 Explain the changes in the voice over a lifetime.

 

4. Understand the role/s of the other professionals who are part of the rehabilitative team

 

 

4:1 Outline the roles of other professionals who are part of the rehabilitative team

 

 

 

4:2 Analyse the roles of other professionals who are part of the rehabilitative team

 

5. Be able to follow on from work undertaken by a Vocal Rehabilitation Specialist with longer-term habilitative singing voice work, re-building healthy vocal function after injury or dysphonia

 

 

5:1 Understand the difference between the work of a Vocal Rehabilitation Specialist and a Vocal Habilitation Professional

 

5:2 Determine longer-term habilitative and healthy voice function exercises after injury or dysphonia 

 

5:3 Explain how to follow on from work undertaken by a Vocal Rehabilitation Specialist

 

6. Understand how to support and guide a singer with muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology

 

 

6:1 Understand and be able to explain that a singer has muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology

 

6:2 Evaluate how to guide a singer with muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology

 

6:3 Plan how to guide a singer with muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology

 

6:4 Select exercises which are appropriate for working with someone who has muscle tension dysphonia

 

6:5 Apply the exercises for the habilitation of a singer with muscle tension dysphonia and no vocal fold pathology

 

7. Understand when to refer a singer for clinical assessment or help from a professional in another field

 

 

7:1 Determine when to refer a singer for clinical assessment or help from a professional in another field

 

 

 

7:2 Explain why you would refer a singer for clinical assessment or help from a professional in another field

 

 

 

 

Module 2 

INFORMATION

In order to document your own learning journey through the next two modules, you will be filling out your own journal. This will document not only what you have done and the ideas that you have learned, but it will also be a record of your own responses to these. 

This journal will be the basis on which you write your own ‘Letter of Introduction’ for your Mentor in Module 3. This document will draw on all of your own experiences so far – both on this course and in your own practice and previous education.

This document also contains the assessment criteria that the tutor will be using to grade you. This will give you an idea of what they will be looking for during the group sessions.

What is reflective practice in the workplace? 

Donald Schön defines reflective practice as “…the ability to reflect on one’s actions so as to engage in a process of continuous learning”. As early as 1971 when observing educational leaders, Schön identified this as a key component to professional growth.

The process of reflective practice in the workplace developed in such disciplines as medicine, social work and teaching as a means of learning from experiences in order to positively influence future outcomes.  When reflecting, a teacher may step back and think about what happened during an exchange with a class, identify what worked, what didn’t and any takeaway lessons.  It is certainly not about being vehemently self-critical or judging oneself harshly, rather it involves asking the right kind of questions.  What went well? What was challenging? What did I learn? How can I improve in the future? Where could I increase my knowledge base? Why did I feel…in that situation? 

Engaging in reflective practice goes deeper than jotting down positive or negative feedback on a form.  Asking questions and contemplating the answers deeply can invite one to re-examine problems from new perspectives.  It could even spark creativity and generate the courage to try new things. In the ever-changing world of voice science, embracing this way of working encourages us to challenge previously held assumptions and encourages us to grow as a practitioner.  

It is highly likely that you are already engaging in or open to engaging in professional practice just by signing up to this course. Something in you has identified a need to gain more knowledge in order to help your clients.  So where do we start?  If you’ve never formally engaged in the process before, there are various models and resources that one could follow to get started. You could try different ones and see what suits you best, because like singing, there is no “one-size fits all”.  You may even come up with your own based on a mix of some of these. 

The four most popular models are: 

  • The ERA cycle (Jasper 2013) which contains three simple stages: Experience, Reflection, Action
  • Driscoll’s “What” Model (essentially What? So What? Now what?” )
  • The Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle (more detailed, four stages) Gibbs, G. (1998) Learning by Doing: A Guide to Teaching and Learning Methods. Oxford: Further Education Unit, Oxford Polytechic.
  • Gibb’s Reflective Cycle: More complex and introduces reflecting on our feelings about an event and coming up with a plan of action if we find ourselves experiencing the same thing again in the future.    Gibbs, G. (1998) Learning by Doing: A Guide to Teaching and Learning Methods. Oxford: Further Education Unit, Oxford Polytechic.

 Whilst some may find using a model too restrictive, it does provide a useful scaffolding if you’re completely new to the process.  There is lots of useful information about reflective practice, its history and application on this Cambridge University link: https://libguides.cam.ac.uk/reflectivepracticetoolkit/whatisreflectivepractice

GUIDANCE NOTES 

Throughout this module you will work in groups.  In session two and three, the Tutor will play 2-3 recordings for you to listen to and evaluate, and you will then discuss your observations in breakout groups. Here are some of the things you may consider under the following three headings. Write your observations and reflections on the Group Listening Feedback Worksheets further down this document.

1) First impressions: What did you observe whilst listening to the recording?  What would you ask this client and why?  
2) Reflection: Now reflect on the above process.  Were you on the right track? If not, what do you think you missed or could have asked? Is there anything else you feel you need to learn or think about for the future?
3) Next Steps: What would be the next step you would choose and why? For example, diagnostic tests, further questions for the client (make a note of what these questions would be), exercises you may set, recommendations to the client such as steaming, vocal pacing or referrals to other specialists if you think this is required.    

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

These are the assessment criteria that the tutor will use in order to grade your progress and participation in each part of module two. 

You will need to score a total of 12 out of a possible 15 points.

Participation
Appropriate Next Steps for the Client
Breadth and Depth of Knowledge

Participation

5

  • Highest standard professional qualities demonstrated throughout.
  • Outstanding awareness, communication and listening skills.
  • Contributions are highly developed, meaningful and move the group conversation forward.
  • Adjusts thinking in response to new information.

4

  • Participation skills demonstrated are excellent.
  • Excellent awareness and communication skills. Actively listens (doesn’t listen to respond).
  • Contributions are valid and move the conversation forward.
  • Accurate responses are given.
  • Adjusts thinking in response to new information.

3

  • Participation skills demonstrated are good.
  • Listens, contributes and responds well.
  • Valid contributions are made.
  • Nearly always accurate with responses.
  • If prompted, might adjust thinking in response to new information.

2

  • Participation skills demonstrated are fair.
  • Demonstrated basic listening skills. Sometimes listens to respond or misses the point.
  • Dialogue doesn’t always drive the conversation forward.
  • Some basic contribution is made but not always coherent or relevant.
  • Not always accurate with responses.

1

  • Participation skills demonstrated are poor.
  • Listening skills and contributions are not well developed.
  • Mostly silent throughout or dominated conversation (for example, filled conversation with personal anecdotes).
  • Was asked to close the dialogue due to dominating the conversation or had lack of awareness of the other participants.
  • Not accurate with responses.

0

  • Little or no participation skills were evident
  • Unacceptable demonstration of awareness. Failed to listen or was seemingly unengaged.
  • Failed to participate / join in discussion.
  • Demonstrated lack of engagement.
  • Was seemingly under confident.

Breadth and Depth of Knowledge

5

  • Highest standard of knowledge demonstrated throughout. 
  • Outstanding breadth of knowledge which is fully internalised.
  • Can interpret knowledge and is adaptable and extremely clear and coherent when explaining to others.
  • Accurate and detailed responses demonstrated.

4

  • Knowledge demonstrated is excellent. 
  • Excellent breadth of knowledge which is internalised.
  • Can interpret knowledge and demonstrate excellence when explaining to others.
  • Accurate responses demonstrated throughout.

3

  • Knowledge demonstrated is good. 
  • Good breadth of knowledge which is internalised.
  • Can interpret knowledge and is good at explaining to others with only minor mistakes
  • Mostly accurate responses demonstrated.

2

  • Knowledge base demonstrated is fair. 
  • A fair understanding of breadth of knowledge.
  • Most of the knowledge is internalised with only minor mistakes
  • Can interpret knowledge and is fairly competent at explaining to others, some mistakes maybe evident.
  • Mostly accurate responses demonstrated but mistakes are evident.

1

  • Knowledge base demonstrated is poor. 
  • Knowledge breadth is not well developed.
  • Mistakes are evident.
  • Is unable to interpret knowledge.
  • Not accurate with responses.

0

  • Little or no knowledge is evident. 
  • Unacceptable demonstration of breadth of knowledge.
  • Failed to respond or with inaccurate with responses.
  • Lack of knowledge was clearly evident

Appropriate Next Steps for the Client

5

  • Highest standard professional qualities demonstrated throughout. 
  • Outstanding awareness of own skill level and boundaries. 
  • Outstanding awareness of appropriate next steps.
  • Understanding is highly developed.

4

  • Demonstrated an excellent understanding of the process. 
  • Excellent awareness of own skill level and boundaries. 
  • Excellent awareness of appropriate next steps.
  • Understanding is developed. 

3

  • Demonstrated a good understanding of the process. 
  • Good awareness of own skill level and boundaries. 
  • Good awareness of appropriate next steps.
  • Understanding is evident when prompted. 

2

  • Demonstrated a fair understanding of the process. 
  • Demonstrated a fair understanding of own skill level and boundaries.
  • Demonstrated a fair understanding of appropriate next steps.
  • Mostly accurate with understanding but mistakes are evident.

1

  • Demonstrated a poor understanding of the process. 
  • Understanding of own skill level is not well developed. Boundaries are unclear.
  • Is unable to interpret next steps.
  • Not accurate with understanding. 

0

  • Little or no awareness of next steps. 
  • Unacceptable demonstration of awareness.
  • Failed to interpret next steps.
  • Lack of understanding clearly evident.  

Module 3

VHP Module 3: The mentoring journey for the VHP learner

The Mentor

VHE mentors are all highly experienced Vocal Rehabilitation Specialists, they will be guiding you through three lessons with a Client.

The Client

The Client will be self-referring. They will be students who either have some basic vocal issues, or they will be already on a waiting list to see a laryngologist and these sessions will be for them to establish good habits before any clinical assessment and treatment. They will all have signed a statement about their current health. 

These are not rehabilitation sessions, they are health-aware singing lessons, or health-aware spoken voice lessons if you have specifically booked for those. If the mentor or learner feels that the client needs to be referred for more specialist assessment, then they must notify the client.

The Mentoring Sessions

In the mentoring phase, there is a set of three guided sessions with the same mentor, learner and client for all three sessions. The learner will work with the client, observed and guided by the mentor. Each session will last an hour, with approximately 35 mins of that spent with the client, and the remaining 25 mins for discussion between the mentor and learner.

These sessions will be online via zoom, on the mentor’s or learner’s own zoom account. The time will be booked via the VHP course manager, the client will be provided by VHE and will commit to all three sessions. 

Before you start:

The VHP course manager will have potential sets of sessions for a VHP learner to sign up for. When these are confirmed, we will put these sessions onto the Client booking schedule. 

Please can you choose time slots that have some flexibility on either side. The booking system is just for the 35 minutes with the Client, you have another 25 minutes between the mentor and the VHP learner, the Mentor may decide to begin your session together a bit earlier to chat things through. A suggested format would be to begin your session 10 minutes before the start time for the Client. You will then have up to 15 mins at the end of the session for discussion. You may wish to change this for sessions two and three, depending on your preferred way of working.

You will also need to complete a letter of introduction to the Mentor. The format for this has been provided. In this you include some background about your professional work, also your perceived Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. You will send this, along with your CV, to the VHP course manager. Keep and continue your reflective journal for now, checking that you have included the feedback and marks from your Module 2 sessions in your workbook.

When you are ready to go

When your sessions are confirmed for all three participants your letter of introduction and CV will be sent to your mentor and you will be put in direct contact to check that you are both happy with the set-up for the first session.

During the mentoring sessions

During each session, the Learner VHP is leading the lesson with the client and the Mentor is there to guide (like a driving instructor with dual control). They may step in and make suggestions at any point, or just observe. 

The Learner will use the Practitioner T&Cs & Client Notes document for sessions, and continue their reflective journal, and share both with the mentor within a week of completing the third session. These two documents must be shared securely using tresorit.  The mentor can compare their perception of the success of the sessions with that of the learner.

The Client will also give feedback at the end of the third session (see below) 

Before you begin, please can you make yourself familiar with the information on the Vocal Health Education website, vocalhealth.co.uk

There is a Scope of Practice for each of the three levels of training on the relevant page for each course, this has the framework for the learning outcomes. 

You will have had a huge amount of material from Module 1 of the course. This includes a pdf of a sample Initial Evaluation Report from Karen Wicklund’s book. There are also several films focussing on the questions that need to be asked, so by this stage you should have a clear idea of your own protocol. Remember that the VHP is a health-aware teacher, not a rehabilitation specialist.

At the end of the three sessions, the learner is awarded a grade: Distinction, Merit, Pass or Not Yet Achieved.

distinction would be someone who is ready to begin rehabilitation training immediately. They would be eligible to join the Vocal Rehabilitation Specialist pathway.
merit would be someone who is a strong habilitation practitioner, who with further practice and experience will be ready for rehabilitation training. They would likely benefit from repeating VHP Module 3 to hone their craft.
pass would be someone who can deliver competent vocal health-informed singing lessons. They would benefit from repeating some modules of the VHP training.
not yet achieved would be someone who hasn’t really ‘got it’ yet, who needs more time to consolidate the information. They would benefit from repeating many or all VHP modules.

Assessment Criteria Levels

These five assessment criteria can be divided into four levels:

Distinction >81% = 17-20 marks per level
Merit 61-80% = 13-16 marks
Pass 40-60% = 8-12 marks
Not Yet Achieved <40% = 0-7 marks

Each area needs specific criteria to reach for each of the four levels.
At each stage, assess whether the learner has considered the BPS implications.

VHP Module 3 Criteria

 

Grading guide

 

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

 

Conduct

 

Does the learner provide a safe space for the client?

 

Some guide questions to shelp:

 

How much does the learner make direct eye contact (rather than note-taking)?


Does the learner establish the nature of the relationship with the client?


Does the learner respect or judge lifestyle choices?


Does the learner establish rapport and trust without dominating or leading?


Is the learner sensitive to confidentiality and potential awkwardness when asking background questions, without being over-cautious?


How well does the learner respond to unexpected information?

No rewardable evidence or the learner fails to:

·  Give a satisfactory client introduction and welcome.

·  Develop rapport with the client.

·  Show respect, empathy and person-centred care and support at an adequate level.

·  Adequately treat people with dignity, respecting individual’s diversity, beliefs, culture, values, needs, privacy.

·  Use adequate contracting language.

·  Ascertain adequate understanding of the client’s relevant medical history and background.

·  Promote a safe and healthy learning environment.

·  Adhere to confidentiality and is aware of how to handle personal information (record, report and store information). 

·  Know that they must seek help and guidance when they are not sure.

 

The learner gives a satisfactory client introduction and welcome.

The learner’s approach is acceptable and there is evidence of some client-teacher rapport throughout the session. Respect, empathy and person-centred care and support is evident at an adequate level.

The learner’s understanding of how to treat people with dignity, respecting individual’s diversity, beliefs, culture, values, needs, privacy and preferences is adequate.

The learner uses an adequate level of contracting language.

The learner ascertains an adequate understanding of the client’s relevant medical history and background.

The learner’s conduct is adequate, and they promote a safe and healthy learning environment. 

*The learner adheres to confidentiality and is aware of how to handle personal information (record, report and store information). 

Where appropriate, the learner knows that they must seek help and guidance when they are not sure.

(P, M and D)

The learner manages the client introduction and welcome well.

The learner’s approach is good and there is a notable client-teacher rapport throughout the session. Respect, empathy and person-centred care and support is evident.

The learner’s understanding of how to treat people with dignity, respecting individual’s diversity, beliefs, culture, values, needs, privacy and preferences is good.

The learner uses a good level of contracting language.

The learner ascertains a good understanding of the client’s relevant medical history and background.

On the whole, the learner’s conduct is professional, and they promote a safe and healthy learning environment. 

*The learner adheres to confidentiality and is aware of how to handle personal information (record, report and store information).

Where appropriate, the learner knows that they must seek help and guidance when they are not sure.

(P, M and D)

The learner manages the client introduction and welcome with ease. 

The learner’s approach is open and there is an excellent client-teacher rapport which remains effortless throughout the session. Respect, empathy and person-centred care and support is evident throughout.

The learner’s understanding of how to treat people with dignity, respecting individual’s diversity, beliefs, culture, values, needs, privacy and preferences is excellent.

The learner uses an excellent level of contracting language.

The learner ascertains a detailed understanding of the client’s relevant medical history and background. 

The learner’s conduct is professional at all times, and they promote a safe and healthy learning environment. 

*The learner adheres to confidentiality and is aware of how to handle personal information (record, report and store information).

Where appropriate, the learner knows that they must seek help and guidance when they are not sure.

(P, M and D)

Conduct

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

 

Communication Skills (listening)

 

Some guide questions to help:

Does the learner appear to follow a set script or are the questions a true response to the information?

Does the learner allow the client to have space/silence for reflection and further answers?

 

No rewardable evidence or the learner fails to:

·  Demonstrates an adequate level of discretion and self-awareness.

 

·  Listens to the client’s responses.

·  Reflect on what the client has discussed to a satisfactory level and give adequate space for the client to express themselves.

The learner demonstrates an adequate level of discretion and self-awareness.

The learner listens to the client’s responses.

The learner can reflect on what the client has discussed to a satisfactory level and gives adequate space for the client to express themselves. 

The learner demonstrates a good level of discretion and self-awareness.

The learner listens well to the client’s responses.

The learner can reflect on what the client has discussed to a good level and gives some space for the client to express themselves. 

The learner demonstrates an excellent level discretion and of self-awareness.

The learner listens actively to the client’s responses.

The learner can reflect on what the client has discussed to an excellent level and gives appropriate space for the client to express themselves.  

Communication Skills (listening)

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

 

Communication skills (questioning and summarising)

 

Some guide questions to help:

Does the learner ask any unexpected questions? 

Is their thinking ahead of the client?

Is the learner making connections from earlier in the session, or from previous sessions?

Does the questioning feel as if it is helpful guidance for the session or does it feel like a questionnaire, or even an inquisition?

No rewardable evidence or the learner fails to:

·  Use a range of open and stepped questioning to an adequate level.

 

·  Use an adequate amount of questioning which moves the client’s assessment forward or choses questions which obstruct the flow of the session.

·  Respond and adjust at an acceptable level.

·  Recall and summarise what the client has discussed to an acceptable level.

The learner uses effective questioning to an adequate level: questioning maybe open or stepped; closed questions are used on occasion; and leading questions are avoided. 


An adequate amount of questioning moves the client’s assessment forward.

The learner can respond and adjust at an acceptable level.

The learner’s ability to recall and summarise what the client has discussed is acceptable.

The learner uses effective questioning to a good level: questioning maybe open or stepped; where closed questions are used, this is followed up with funnel questioning; and leading questions are avoided.


The majority of questioning moves the client’s assessment forward. 

The learner can respond and adjust at a good level.

The learner’s ability to recall and summarise what the client has discussed is good.  

The learner uses effective questioning to an excellent level: questioning is open or stepped; where closed questions are used, this is followed up with funnel questioning; and leading questions are not used.


All lines of questioning move the client’s assessment forward.

The learner can respond and adjust accordingly.

The learner can appropriately recall and summarise what the client has discussed.  

Communication skills (questioning and summarising)

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

Knowledge Base (Working with a Client)

 

Some guide questions to help:

Do the learner’s questions come from a place of knowledge as well as awareness?

Is the learner able to integrate bio-psycho-social elements into their thinking and questioning process?

Does the learner apply knowledge from other fields when relevant?

Are the exercises diagnostic or prescriptive? Does the learner know the difference?

 

No rewardable evidence or the learner fails to:

·  Recall and communicate adequate knowledge and understanding.

·  Be accurate with subject-specific terminology or subject-specific terminology is basic and inconsistent.

·  Implement action strategies at an adequate level.

 

The learner recalls and communicates adequate knowledge and understanding for the client.

When undertaking technical guidance, subject-specific terminology is used accurately and at an adequate level throughout the sessions. 

Positive action strategies are implemented at an adequate level. 

*All exercises given, and repertoire used was appropriate and safe for the client.  

(P, M and D)

The learner recalls and communicates a good range of knowledge and understanding in a relatable way for the client.

When undertaking technical guidance, subject-specific terminology is used accurately and at a good level throughout the sessions. 

Positive action strategies are implemented at a good level. 

*All exercises given, and repertoire used was appropriate and safe for the client.  

(P, M and D)

The learner recalls and communicates a range of comprehensive knowledge and understanding in a relatable way for the client.

When undertaking technical guidance, subject-specific terminology is used accurately and appropriately throughout the sessions. 

Positive action strategies are implemented at an excellent level. 

*All of the technical guidance, and repertoire used was appropriate and safe for the client.  

(P, M and D)

Knowledge Base (Working with a Client)

 

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

Next steps

Some guide questions to help:

Does the learner explain to the client what is going on?

Is the progression to the next session clear?

Are there exercises or tasks for the client, is the client fully aware of the expectations and purpose of these?

Is the client fully supported in their actions following on from these sessions?

Has the learner understood where they could improve as well as what went well?

No rewardable evidence or the learner fails to:

·  Manage the sessions, including preparation, planning and flow of progression at an adequate level.

 

·  Justify their actions to an adequate level where the proposed plan needs to be revised.

·  Gives adequate advice about further work (either referring on or supplementary support).

·  Comment on some of their approaches, skills and accomplishments.

The learner has managed the sessions, including preparation, planning and flow of progression at an adequate level.

If – for any reason – the proposed plan needs to be revised, the learner can justify their actions to an adequate level.

If appropriate, the learner gives adequate advice about further work (either referring on or supplementary support).

The learner can provide comments on some of their approaches, skills and accomplishments. 

 

The learner has managed the sessions, including preparation, planning and flow of progression at a good level.

If – for any reason – the proposed plan needs to be revised, the learner can justify their actions successfully.

If appropriate, the learner gives good advice about further work (either referring on or supplementary support).

The learner can evaluate some of their approaches, skills and accomplishments. 

 

The learner has managed the sessions, including preparation, planning and flow of progression at an excellent level.

If – for any reason – the proposed plan needs to be revised, the learner can thoroughly justify their actions.

If appropriate, the learner gives appropriate guidance about further work (either referring on or supplementary support).

The learner can evaluate a range of their approaches, skills and accomplishments. 

 

Next steps

 

 

Not Yet Achieved (NYA)

0-7

PASS

8-12

MERIT

13-16

DISTINCTION

17-20

 

 

Client feedback: At the end of the third session the learner moves to the waiting room and the mentor asks the client for feedback rating on a 0-5 scale. The VHP can then be brought back in to finish the mentoring part of the session. If the client wishes to they can send any additional feedback to vhp@vocalhealth.co.uk.

Client Feedback

 

Scale Rating for Questions 1-3

(Please place a cross on the scale accordingly)

 

0

Not at all/ never

1

Hardly ever

2

Some of the time

3

Often

4

Most of the time

5

Yes/

definitely

1.     Did this teacher make you feel comfortable? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.     Did you think that this teacher understood the issues with your voice?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.     Were exercises offered relevant and clear?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scale Rating for Question 4

(Please place a cross on the scale accordingly)

 

0

No

1

Probably not

Possibly

3

Very likely

 

4

Highly likely

5

Yes/

Definitely

 

4.     Would you recommend this teacher to a friend or colleague?